Two other problems associated with teenage girls—that is, occurring with greater frequency in girls than boys—are eating disorders and self injury, or cutting. While both of these can overlap with depression, the common assumption that they're caused by depression is not borne out by research. Girls who have eating disorders often show no signs of depression; indeed, they are often very high-functioning, competitive girls who have a distorted body image, but not the symptoms of depression. Similarly, self-injurious behavior is a kind of dysfunctional coping mechanism kids get into to alleviate emotional pain, or numbness they've developed as a result of that pain. It can occur with, and be complicated by, a mood disorder, but isn't thought to be a result of the latter. Antidepressants, the medication of choice for mood disorders, don't usually alleviate eating disorders or cutting, which receive different kinds of treatment. Ambien® (zolpidem) "A lot of it is a holdover from the days where the perception was that sleeping pills would cause dependence and there would be abuse liability," said author James Walsh, executive director and senior scientist at the Sleep Medicine and Research Center at St. Luke's Hospital in Chesterfield, Missouri. "There was a feeling that they only worked for short periods of time and you develop tolerance to those medicines. Those impressions came from pills used until the 1970s." "A lot of it is a holdover from the days where the perception was that sleeping pills would cause dependence and there would be abuse liability," said author James Walsh, executive director and senior scientist at the Sleep Medicine and Research Center at St. Luke's Hospital in Chesterfield, Missouri. "There was a feeling that they only worked for short periods of time and you develop tolerance to those medicines. Those impressions came from pills used until the 1970s." order generic zopiclone side, Ambien® (zolpidem) Buspirone Many people believe that if you start taking a psychiatric medication you will need to take it forever.  In most cases this is not true.  Most officers take medications for about 9 months to one year.   I ask an officer to make a commitment to take the medication for at least one year from the time they are on a dose that is effective.  At the end of that year you reevaluate your situation.  Is it better?  If you have made some positive changes, relationships have improved, work is fun again, then you talk to your doctor about reducing the medication.  Reduce the medication slowly and if life stays good, your brain neurochemistry is back in balance and you can stop. "A lot of it is a holdover from the days where the perception was that sleeping pills would cause dependence and there would be abuse liability," said author James Walsh, executive director and senior scientist at the Sleep Medicine and Research Center at St. Luke's Hospital in Chesterfield, Missouri. "There was a feeling that they only worked for short periods of time and you develop tolerance to those medicines. Those impressions came from pills used until the 1970s." buy best price sibutramine